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EACE22 Speed Learning Sessions

Friday, June 24 | 8:30 - 9:45 AM | Salon A

Join us for three rounds of the following 20-minute sessions in a casual roundtable format! Choose any three topic tables to join.

  1. Careers Ahoy! Developing a Virtual Career Services Scavenger Hunt
  2. Creating a Multi-School Employer Relations Group
  3. LinkedIn Groups: Building Community Through All Connections
  4. Meaning & the Modern Job Market
  5. Placing Our Bets on All College Students:  African American Women Count Too
  6. The Faculty Connection: Collaborating with Faculty to Bring Career Planning into the Classroom
  7. Workflow with the Project Management Tool, Trello

1. Careers Ahoy! Developing a Virtual Career Services Scavenger Hunt
The session is designed to increase the remote footprint of a career services office, both during remote learning and engagement as well as when we return to in-person learning. This presentation will focus on the Career Services Scavenger Hunt activity developed for the Fall 2020 semester. Over Zoom, students were sent into breakout rooms with each group being given the link to a Google JamBoard. The JamBoards contained 10 clues that required students to find various resources on the Career Services' web pages. After 30 minutes, the groups returned to the main room and shared their discoveries with their peers. This resulted in both self-teaching and peer-to-peer instruction.

Presenters:

  • Ryan Atwell, Assistant Director of Career Services & Internship Programs, Marymount Manhattan College
  • Robin Nackman, Executive Director of Career Services, Marymount Manhattan College

2. Creating a Multi-School Employer Relations Group
At the onset of Covid, employer relations professionals in higher education were faced with a variety of issues, everything from employer/student engagement in a virtual world, to learning about and coordinating virtual career fairs. We found that we were relying on each other for advice and guidance. Through this we saw a need for a consortium of employer relations professionals in our geographic area. Our goal was to create a community of professionals that are engaged in strategically cultivating and strengthening employer relations with and between employers, students, alumni, and faculty to maximize student success by providing employment and experiential learning opportunities. Covid-19 has impacted everything we do as employer relations professionals. We created this group so that we can lean into our peers to learn from one another as to how to best navigate these unprecedented times. This session will explain how this group came to be, and the benefits that we have seen for ourselves, our employers and our students.

Presenters:

  • Darlene Johnson, Director, External Relations, Hofstra University
  • Donna Haynes, Senior Director of Employer Relations, St. John's University

3. LinkedIn Groups: Building Community Through All Connections
Let's practice what we preach! Through a 20-minute speed learning session, Suffolk University career center staff shares how launching a LinkedIn Groups initiative with an industry-focus created a sense of community and amplified student reach and marketing. Join us to learn more about how to implement a no-cost initiative that drives students to events, opportunities, and finding new connections and mentorship. LinkedIn Groups were created at Suffolk University based on 9-industry aligned Career Communities, which officially launched in Fall 2021.

Presenters:

  • Narali Taglialavore, Assistant Director, Career Communities, Suffolk University
  • Kelley Garland, Assistant Director of Career Communities - STEM & Sustainability, Suffolk University

4. Meaning & the Modern Job Market
The concept of supply and demand is so central to our economy we often cite it beyond simple goods and services. But what if we apply that idea to what job seekers want. Do Millennials wanting meaning in their work or Gen Z looking for stability coupled with work that aligns with their values indicate something is lacking in the labor market? Then again, not every college student has the luxury of seeking meaningful work. Does such language act as gentrification of our thinking and structuring of the services career centers offer?

This speed session will explore these questions and what we can do to be more equitable in our services and how we can press for the labor market, and the jobs in it, to offer more than a paycheck and 401K. Discerning and understanding these dynamics help career center personnel adapt services to align with students' values and better support those too often left out.

Presenter: Chris Miciek, Director, Jefferson University

5. Placing Our Bets on All College Students:  African American Women Count Too
Race, gender, and class have a lasting impact on African American women. This impact has historically shaped the lived experiences of African American women including their career goals. Based on a narrative study, this workshop will share the perceptions of five African American undergraduate women at a predominantly White institution regarding their career aspirations, and the impact that race, gender, and class have on the preparation of those aspirations. From the data collected, four themes emerged related to (1) college preparation (2) helping others (3) campus experiences, and (4) support systems. The implications from findings suggest that African American women are in need of career development that recognizes the dynamics of race, gender, and class; transcends conventional strategies; and adopts culturally relevant initiatives.

Presenter: Nicole Milan-Tyner, Assistant Professor for the School of Health Sciences, Stockton University

6. The Faculty Connection: Collaborating with Faculty to Bring Career Planning into the Classroom
Students need new kinds of skills and understandings to conduct effective job searches and plan career trajectories in this ever-changing, high-tech world. Many of these competencies can be taught in courses that blend the study of modern, mediated communication and identity formation with practical, personalized career planning. In this presentation, the director of the program in Digital Communication, Information, and Media at Rutgers University will discuss how faculty and career professionals at Rutgers have collaborated to create courses that integrate theory and research regarding modern forms of communication and identity construction with the development of hands-on digital networking, job search skills, and career planning. The dynamics of the connection and collaboration between faculty members and career professionals will be highlighted.

Presenter: Mary Chayko, Distinguished Teaching Professor of Communication and Information, Rutgers University

7. Workflow with the Project Management Tool, Trello
Learn how to streamline your work and collaborate more effectively within a team using the project management tool, Trello.  You will learn how to use Trello to help you plan large to small-scale events, work on collaborative-based projects, and manage the work of peer career advisors.  In addition, learn how to empower students to integrate these tools into their own work and job search process. Join this session to learn a new way to organize your work!

Presenter: Jodi Schneiderman, Assistant Director, Employer Relations & Industry Advising, Georgetown University